RedShift Quick-Release Aerobars

The RedShift Quick-Release Aerobars allow cyclists to frequently switch between riding with or without aerobars. They are quite comfortable and reasonably adjustable, but the adjustability wasn’t sufficient for me and I always leave my aerobars mounted, so the extra weight of the quick-release mechanism is unnecessary.

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The problems with “gravel” versions of drop handlebars and some better solutions

There is a major recent trend for gravel bikes to be equipped with non-standard shapes of drop handlebars: flared bars, riser bars, and dual-level bars. I explain why I wouldn’t recommend any of these odd handlebar shapes over using a standard drop handlebar of the preferred width and an appropriate-height stem. I instead give better solutions for how to achieve each of the goals of these oddly-shaped bars while using a standard drop handlebar.

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Recommended crank length to avoid cycling discomfort

Over two-thirds of cyclists are using cranks that are longer than recommended. Using cranks that are too long can cause cycling discomfort and injuries, especially when riding longer distances, due to excessive articulation of the knee and hip at the top of the pedal stroke; using cranks that are too short is far less likely to cause problems. I give general recommendations on what crank lengths are suitable for people in various height ranges.

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Product Review: RedShift Dual-Position Seatpost

The RedShift Dual-Position Seatpost allows cyclists to easily change the fore and aft saddle position while riding, so it’s useful for people riding a road bike with clip-on aerobars who want the saddle setback to be optimized for both positions. I found it to be well made and to function admirably.

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Bike Frames & Brakes

Advice on choosing a bicycle frame (material, geometry, etc.) for long-distance cycling and the pros and cons of rim brakes versus disc brakes on road bikes.

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